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Barry Larkin (1983-85)
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Barry Larkin arrived at Michigan to play football for Bo Schembechler but never played a down, instead making an immediate impact as a freshman by winning the Big Ten Baseball Tournament MVP award in 1983. He finished his Wolverine career among the best ever in slugging, runs and steals and earned back-to-back Big Ten Player of the Year awards, helping the Wolverines to two College World Series appearances. Larkin moved on to a successful pro career with the Cincinnati Reds, making 12 all-star teams, earning nine Silver Slugger awards and three Gold Gloves and being named the 1995 National League MVP. He also won the World Series with the Reds in 1990. Larkin was inducted into the College Baseball Hall of Fame in 2009. [ Read More ]
Tiffany Ofili (2006-09)
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Tiffany Ofili was a five-time national champion and All-America selection during one of the most successful four-year runs in the history of Michigan women’s track and field. Ofili won three straight national crowns (2007-09) in the 100-meter hurdles, leading U-M to three top-10 finishes at the NCAA Outdoor Championships, including a program-best third place finish in 2007. She also captured two consecutive 60-meter hurdle titles (2008-09), helping Michigan to its best NCAA indoor finish in 2008 (third). Ofili was part of two Big Ten championship teams, as the Wolverines captured the indoor crown in 2006 and outdoor title in 2007 while earning Big Ten Indoor Track Athlete of the Year in 2009. Since completing her eligibility in 2009, Ofili has continued training as a professional and completing her degree in pharmacy from the University of Michigan School of Pharmacy. The Michigan record-holder in the 60-meter dash (7.42), 60-meter hurdles (7.94) and 100-meter hurdles (12.73) has continued to be involved in the Michigan track and field program, serving as an undergraduate assistant coach in 2010. [ Read More ]
Don Lund, Jackie Robinson, Branch Rickey
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On April 12, 1947, Brooklyn Dodgers president Branch Rickey signed three players from his team's top farm club, the Montreal Royals, to the Dodgers' major league roster. One was a sharp-eyed third baseman named Spider Jorgensen, who would someday be a successful major league scout. One was Detroit native and three-sport University of Michigan letterman Don Lund, whose baseball career would eventually circle back to both his alma mater and his hometown team. The other was Jackie Robinson. He would make history. [ Read More ]
Desmond Howard (1989-91)
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Desmond Howard has been a winner at everything he does. Heisman Trophy. Super Bowl MVP. Video game poster boy. One of ESPN's top college football analysts. The All-American receiver and kick returner was a two-time All-Big Ten selection and earned 85 percent of the Heisman vote – at the time the largest majority in the trophy's history. In 1991, he led the nation in scoring and his 19 touchdown receptions tied him for the second-most in NCAA history. Howard earned his degree in the spring of 1992 and went on to play 11 seasons in the NFL, earning Super Bowl MVP honors with the Green Bay Packers. Howard is now a part of the ESPN College GameDay crew, working as one of the most respected college football analysts in the business. [ Read More ]
Stacey Thomas (1997-2000)
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Stacey Thomas knew how to fill out a boxscore, finishing her career first at U-M in steals and in the top 10 in five other categories. She broke onto the scene earning Big Ten Freshman of the Year honors and hit her stride as a junior, breaking the Big Ten all-time steals record and earning Defensive Player of the Year honors. After graduation, she was drafted by the Portland Fire in the second round of the WNBA Draft. She played for Portland, Arizona and the Detroit Shock, winning a WNBA Championship with the Shock. She continued her career overseas, always staying involved in basketball in the United States. [ Read More ]
Eddie Tolan (1929-31)
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Eddie Tolan was largely considered the king of U.S. sprinting from 1929-31. On May 25, 1929, "The Midnight Express" was the first man in the world to be officially credited with a time of 9.5 for 100 yards. As a member of the U-M track and field team, Tolan won races at the Big Ten Championships four times, including two wins in the 100-yard dash. At the Olympic Trials in 1932, Ralph Metcalfe of Marquette beat Tolan in the 100 meters and was largely considered the favorite for the Olympic gold medal. When the 100-meter preliminary heats were run, Tolan beat Metcalfe, setting an Olympic record of 10.4. In the final, Tolan and Metcalfe finished in a dead heat. In the first games to institute photo-finish capabilities, seven judges watched the tape several hours to determine that Tolan crossed the line inches ahead of Metcalfe, establishing a new Olympic record at 10.3. After narrowly qualifying to the 200-meter final, Tolan captured his second gold medal with another Olympic record (21.2). [ Read More ]
Justin (2003-07) and Torrance Laury (2007-10)
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Justin and Torrance Laury never expected to compete together at the University of Michigan since they were five years apart, but an injury to older brother Justin (left) allowed them to share one season together. Torrance helped his older brother return from injury and the two propelled Michigan to a fourth-place finish at the 2007 NCAA Championships. Together, the Laurys have been shining examples of hard work, determination and brotherhood. [ Read More ]
Alayne Ingram (1998-2002)
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Alayne Ingram was known for her three-point shooting prowess and her great skills with the ball, leading Michigan to four postseason appearances including back-to-back trips to the NCAA Tournament in 1999-00 and 2000-01—a first for the Michigan women's program. Ingram's name is littered throughout the Michigan record books. She ranks seventh all-time at Michigan in scoring and finished her career with 1,461 career points, and is one of only 19 1,000 point scorers in program history. She still holds U-M's records for three-point field goals made (182) and three-point field goals attempted (583). Ingram was named to the All-Big Ten second team in 2002 and was the Coaches Awards recipient in 1999. She didn't stray far from basketball after graduation and was drafted by the Sacramento Monarchs in the third round of the WNBA Draft in 2002. Ingram, no longer playing, is currently the Director of Public Relations for the Los Angeles Sparks. [ Read More Get Acrobat Reader ]
Jarrett Hubbard (1971-74)
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Jarrett Hubbard was a two-time NCAA champion and four-time All-American at 150 pounds for the Wolverines. As a freshman, he astounded the Big Ten by taking the conference championship and going on to place fourth at the NCAA Championship in his first appearance. He would claim two more Big Ten titles in 1972 and 1974. Hubbard suffered his lone Big Ten defeat as a junior when he narrowly lost in the 150-pound final to Wisconsin's Rick Lawinger, 2-1. The loss was the last of his collegiate career. He cruised through the 1973 NCAA Championships, avenging his loss to Lawinger in the NCAA championship match. The NCAA run began a stretch of 31 consecutive wins for Hubbard, who posted a perfect 26-0 record during his senior campaign en route to his second straight NCAA crown. A team captain of the 1973-74 squad. Hubbard finished his career with an 80-8 career record; his .909 career winning percentage still third among all Wolverine wrestlers. After his graduation, he returned to Joliet where he taught and coached at East Joliet High School. He was inducted into Michigan's Hall of Honor in 2004. [ Read More Get Acrobat Reader ]
Nikki Peters (1996-99)
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Nikki Peters was a six-time All-American and four-time All-Big Ten honoree during one of the most successful stretches in U-M women's gymnastics history. She helped Michigan advance to the Super Six on three occasions including a runner-up finish in 1999. She won five individual Big Ten titles, posting three 10.0 scores at the Big Ten Championships and nearly completed a triple crown (individual event titles in one event at Big Tens, Regionals and nationals) in 1999 when she captured the first two legs and finished second at Individual Event Finals. Peters now works for the Chicago Parks District. [ Read More Get Acrobat Reader ]
Marissa Young (2000-03)
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Marissa Young joined an elite class of collegiate softball players when she was selected for her third All-America honor following her senior season in 2003, becoming just the third Wolverine to accomplish the feat in program history. A four-year force in the pitching circle, Young posted an 88-24 career record with a 1.13 ERA and school-record 927 strikeouts (since broken). She also set the standard for the Wolverines from the power department at the plate during the early part of the decade, wrapping her career with 22 home runs, 133 runs batted in and a .441 slugging percentage. Contributing to a pair of Big Ten titles over her tenure, Young was named the 2003 Big Ten Player of the Year and 2002 Big Ten Pitcher of Year. She is currently the head softball coach at Concordia University in Ann Arbor. [ Read More ]
Moses Fleetwood Walker (1882)
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Moses Fleetwood Walker is credited with being the first African American to play baseball at the major league level. He enrolled at the University of Michigan as a junior in 1881 and lettered for the Wolverines during the 1882 season. Walker signed on as a catcher with the minor league Northwestern League Toledo Blue Stockings in 1883 in an era when few catchers wore any equipment, including gloves. In 1884, Toledo joined the American Association, which was a Major League at that time in competition with the National League. Walker made his Major League debut on May 1 versus the Louisville Eclipse. His brother, Weldy Walker (who also played at Michigan), later joined him on the team, playing in six games. The Walker brothers are the first known African Americans to play baseball in the Major Leagues. [ Read More Get Acrobat Reader ]
William DeHart Hubbard (1923-25)
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William DeHart Hubbard made history at the 1924 Olympics in Paris when he became the first African-American to win a gold medal (long jump). While at Michigan (1923-25), Hubbard was a three-time NCAA champion (1923 & 1925 Outdoor Long Jump; 1925 100-yard dash) and a seven-time Big Ten champion. In June 1925, he set a world record in the long jump with a 25-10 ¾ (7.89 meters) performance. He later served as a race relations adviser for the Federal Housing Authority and was inducted into the U-M Hall of Honor in 1979. [ Read More ]

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